Posts tagged: Titan Fitness

MMA Legend, Erik Paulson, Is Coming To State College/Penn State To Conduct A MMA Seminar In October 2009

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MMA pioneer, Erik Paulson, will be making his annual Combat Submission Wrestling(CSW) Seminar visit to Titan Fitness, State College, PA on October 24th and 25th, 2009To reserve your spot please contact Paul Zelinka or Bruce Lombard @ 814-235-1015 or info@titanfitness.com.  You can also visit www.titanfitness.com or www.lombardmma.comfor more information.  Do not miss this opportunity to learn from one of the top MMA Coaches and former fighter’s in the world.

 

Erik Paulson is the former 2-time light heavyweight Shooto World Champion.  He is the only American ever to achieve this title.  Coach Paulson travels around the world to share his MMA knowledge and fighting system.  His seminars are known for the abundance of information, interaction, and charisma.

Erik Paulson is the founder of Combat Submission Wrestling(CSW).  CSW is regarded as the most dominant MMA system in the world.  This fighting system encompasses three areas: kickboxing, clinching, and grappling.  Combat Submission Wrestling is a blend of many systems which includes: Muay Thai, French Savate, Western Boxing, Greco-Roman, Freestyle Wrestling, Shooto, Judo, Brazilian Jui Jitsu.

Erik currently trains some of the top MMA fighters in the world, including: Josh Barnett(UFC veteran, Pride Veteran, Affliction #1 heavyweight contender); Bobalu Sobral(UFC veteran, Affliction light heavyweight); and coach/cornerman for Brock Lesner(current UFC Heavyweight Champion.

Please visit Erik @ www.erikpaulson.com

Titan Fitness member wins first fight

Jordan Katz, a member of Titan Fitness, faced his first Muay Thai fight on July 25, 2009 at the Hamburg Field House and won his match two minutes and 30 seconds into the third round.

Mark, has you ordered this medicine? Do you satisfied? Viagra pill. Many rogue pharmacies are happy to bypass a doctor’s prescription in order to win your business.

Katz, 21, is a Pennsylvania State University student majoring in Information Science and Technology who is from Monroeville, Pa. Typically, Katz has trained at Titan Fitness about three times a week for the past 10 months. In the months before the fight, however, he upped his training to between eight to 10 times each week.

When UofCombat spoke with Katz the week before his fight, he was confident that his training with Titan Fitness had prepared him, and he knew that he had done everything he could to be prepared for the fight. In an interview after his fight, Katz talks about his emotions throughout the fight, factors he attributes to his victory and when he knew he had his opponent beat.


UofCombat.com: What were your emotions as you entered the facility?
Jordan Katz: I felt kind of uneasy. I didn’t know what to expect since it was my first fight, (so) I think that’s where the uneasiness came from.

UofC: How did they change throughout the match?  Were you feeling positive during the fight, or wondering if your opponent would win?
JK: Honestly, I don’t remember much from the fight; my head was empty the whole time. I wasn’t thinking about winning the fight; I was just fighting.

UofC: What were your initial thoughts when your first saw your opponent?
JK: “That’s him? Okay, let’s go.”
I don’t think it would have mattered to me whether he was stocky, lanky, or whatever; I was just going to go out there and do what I came to do.

UofC: When did you realize you had your opponent beat?
JK: When the ref broke us up and I saw the towel had been thrown in.

UofC: Going into the match, did you feel you were prepared enough?
JK: Absolutely. I didn’t have any nerves or second-thoughts walking into the ring, and I know that’s because of how prepared I was.

UofC: What do you feel you did well in the match?  What’s something you feel you need to improve on?
JK: I just finished watching the video, and my hands looked fast and accurate, but I wasn’t setting up my kicks very well.

UofC: Did you have supporters in the audience?  How did they influence your performance?
JK: I had family and friends in the stands, but during the fight I couldn’t hear any cheering, and before the fight I didn’t want to talk to them so I could stay focused. So I would say they didn’t influence my performance, but it was great to see them after the fight, and I loved having them there to support me.

UofC: How much of an influence do you feel the staff at Titan Fitness had on your win?
JK: This is as much their win as it mine. Without Bruce Lombard my coach, Shawn Slater my training partner and Paul Zelinka along with everyone else that helped me train, that fight wouldn’t be possible. I have them to thank for everything.

UofC: What are your plans now?  Will you take some time off or get right back into training?
JK: I’m home now because I couldn’t afford to stay (in State College) for the rest of summer, but I’m staying in shape and would like to continue training during the school year.

Titan Fitness members prepare for first fight

After much hard work, two Titan Fitness members are ready to fight in their first matches.  Shawn Slater, 24, and Jordan Katz, 21, are competing in a Muay Thai fight on Saturday, July 25 at the Hamburg Field House, where they will see if all their training and hard work has paid off.

 

Slater, originally from State College, Pa., graduated from Penn State in 2007 with a  degree in Crime, Law and Justice.  He’s been training at Titan Fitness since January of 2007.

 

Katz is currently a Penn State student from Monroeville, Pa. majoring in Information Science and Technology.  

 

Thai boxing, or Muay Thai, differs from traditional western boxing by allowing eight points of contact; the hands, elbows, knees and shins are used in Thai boxing, compared to just fists in western boxing.

 

To get ready for his upcoming fight, Slater has upped the intensity of his workouts, and has added extra workouts twice a day on Tuesdays and Thursdays for about the past two months.  During training, Slater likes to see how far he can push himself mentally and physically.

 

“I’m confident in my abilities, (but) this is my first fight so I don’t completely know what to expect… I’ll do my best,” Slater said.   “When I’m sparring hard, I try to think about nothing and use the openings my opponent gives me.”

 

Katz also said that “ideally nothing” will be going through his head during the fight.  Hopefully I will have drilled and sparred enough times that I will just react,” Katz said.

 

Katz, who’s been training at Titan Fitness for almost a year, has been training between eight to ten times a week for the upcoming match, compared to usually having only three Thai workouts a week when he’s not preparing for a fight.

 

Jordan Katz during his Jordan Katz during his Level I Thai Shorts Test

Jordan Katz during his Jordan Katz during his Level I Thai Shorts Test

 

I enjoy being part of a sport again; I haven’t had that since high school… Mostly, I enjoy the nature of the sport. It’s one on one, there are no assists.  You’re either to blame or to congratulate, its all on you,” Katz said.  “Knowing that I am prepared is all the confidence that I’ll need.”

 

Despite their confidence, neither Katz not Slater know much about their opponents, both of who are also facing their first fight. 

 

Slater is already looking ahead in his career, hoping to have more Muay Thai fights and eventually start competing in mixed martial arts after more training.  Throughout his training at Titan Fitness, he’s said he has had great experience with both Bruce Lombard, martial arts director, and Paul Zelinka, who created lifting and conditioning routines for Slater, as well as being knowledgeable with nutrition.

 

While training in Muay Thai, Katz is also in Titan Fitness’ Elite Training and said being a part of Titan Fitness has been a great experience and recommends it to anyone interested in martial arts.

 

When he’s not training, Slater enjoys watching successful fighters John Wayne Parr in Muay Thai fights and Sean Sherk in mixed martial arts events.

 

 

Titan Fitness member tells all about Thailand experience

Kevin Chan, a member of Titan Fitness, recently had the opportunity to travel to Phuket, Thailand to spend a month training at a Thai Boxing camp.

Chan is from Queens, NY. and is a recent graduate of Penn State University and majored in accounting.

Thai boxing, or Muay Thai, is a form of martial arts commonly practiced in Southeast Asia and is Thailand’s national sport. Muay Thai is different compared to other forms of martial arts and boxing because more points of contact are permitted. Use of the hands, elbows, knees and shins are allowed, making eight points of contact for fighters to try to take advantage of.

Titan Fitness recently asked Chan, 21, to share his experiences with readers. In this excerpt, he talks about his time training in Thailand.

Titan Fitness: How you got involved with Thai boxing?
Kevin
: Since I had been boxing for a while, I wanted to try something different and decided to learn Muay Thai in the country where it originated from.

TF: What is your experience with martial arts?
K
: I have been boxing at Titan for a little over a year. I have never fought, but I would like to in the near future.

TF: What has your experience been like belonging to Titan Fitness?
K
: I decided to join Titan in the summer of 2008 and instantly discovered that it is a great gym. The gym atmosphere is vibrant and friendly. The instructors have a lot of experience and are very helpful. I also met a lot of other Penn State students and became friends with many of them. It’s the best gym I have been to and I would still be training there if I was at State College.

TF: How did you get the opportunity to go to Thailand?  Did you have any hesitations about going?
K
: I had just graduated and wanted to travel during the summer before I started working. Even though I didn’t travel alone, I definitely still had some hesitations as to traveling to Thailand because of the political climate, and because I never had gone to a Muay Thai camp before. All my hesitations went away when I arrived, and I had a great experience.

Kevin Chan, right, with trainer Namsaknoi, who was considered as one of the best Muay Thai fighters in Thailand.

Kevin Chan, right, with trainer Namsaknoi, who was considered as one of the best Muay Thai fighters in Thailand.

TF: Where did you stay while in Thailand?
K
: I stayed at a resort that was close to the Muay Thai camp, which was extremely comfortable and convenient.

TF: What did you do on a typical day in Thailand?
K
: We trained twice a day from Monday to Saturday. The first session was in the morning and the other was in the afternoon. Each session lasted for about two hours. I also had plenty of time to explore and visit many different beaches and tourist sites within the island.

TF: How important is Thai boxing to their culture?
K
: Thai boxing is the national sport of Thailand and plays a big part in Thai culture from what I observed. The Wai Khru is a great example of it. It is a traditional dance that the fighters must perform before they fight to show respect.

TF: Overall, how would you rate the experience?  Do you plan to continue to train here in the U.S.?
K
: It was a really great experience for me, as I met a lot of nice people and had a great time. I definitely plan to return to the same camp in the future. I will also continue to train in boxing and Muay Thai here in the U.S.

No-Gi-Grappling: Broken down to build you up

Summer is always a good time to get out of your air-conditioned house and try something new and different from your usual workout routine.  For many, summer also gives more freedom in a relaxed atmosphere and time to step out of comfort zones; power-walking and tennis at the country club get old after awhile.  If you’re really feeling adventurous, try one of the fast-growing popular new sports in America, Mixed Martial Arts.

With the many various forms of MMA fighting, one may get overwhelmed with deciding which route to try out.  (And, if you’re in the middle of nowhere in Central Pennsylvania, believe that you have no shot of finding classes near you.)

No-Gi Grappling:  Unless you’re familiar with the MMA world, you may have never heard of this type of submission technique.  However, it is quickly becoming popular and is used frequently in MMA fights- there are even nutritional supplements intended for performing No-Gi Grappling.  With odd-sounding names of techniques from Rear Naked Arm Crush to Japanese Necktie, one is sure to find a technique that is best for their style of fighting.

According to No-Gi-Grappling.com, fighters have described the Japanese Necktie as “the quickest tap I ever got.”  What makes this technique so hard to get out of are several things.  It’s an extremely tight hold, made by trapping the leg of the opponent and then pushing his chest on the back of the opponent’s neck and squeezing, leaving fighters no other choice but to “tap out.” 

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No-Gi Grappling is a program based off of Combat Submission Wrestling, which was founded by Erik Paulson.  Back in the 1990s, the Gracie family was the first to show the effectiveness of grappling in UFC events and it evolved from there.

No-Gi Grappling is similar to grappling, which involves controlling and handling an opponent through various types of holds, instead of striking.  It includes choke holds and ground fighting, as well as standing.  These holds involve throwing, locking and pinning one’s opponent.  In ground fighting, escapes are also used.  Grappling sports include jiu-jitsu, judo, mixed martial arts and wrestling.

Both types focus on taking down the opponent, but the ways they aim to accomplish this are different.  To learn more about these differences, click here.

If you’re located in Central Pennsylvania, Titan Fitness in downtown State College offers classes teaching No-Gi Grappling.  Click HERE for more information.

According to their website at titanfitness.com, No-Gi Grappling classes generally teach an athlete “to compete in submission grappling tournaments. It also has a strong influence on the importance of striking on the ground for both self-defense purposes and MMA competitive fighting.”

Even if you’re not training seven days a week to win an MMA Championship, practicing No-Gi Grappling, or any type of MMA training for that matter, is good both for fitness and self-defense purposes.  Don’t worry, those sore muscles are to be expected!

Thanks to No-Gi-Grappling.com

 

Amateur MMA Fight – Mike Putnam (State College, PA)

hard knocks cage fights

hard knocks cage fights

MAY 3, 2008 - ‘Hard Knocks Cage Fights’

 Mike Putnam, trained by MMA Coach, Bruce Lombard, of Titan Fitness in State College, PA won his amateur MMA debuwith a split decision victory(29-28,28-29,29-28) over previously unbeaten Ohio native Josh Baker, in the 145lb weight division.  The two strong willed fighters went back and forth for three rounds with no clear advantage for either fighter standing or on the ground.  In the first round Putnam almost got caught in a choke in Josh’s guard, but he cleared the submission attempt and threw down some effective ground and pound as he cleared Baker’s guard.  Baker landed a few heavy punches to the head of his opponent in the second round, but they did not seem to phase Putnam’s attack.  The third round was a back and forth battle as well, but in the end, I think the judges decision came down to Putnam’s control in the clinch game.  Mike controlled his tough opponent in the clinch throughout the first two rounds keeping him pinned against the cage and landing many effective knees. 

This event was promoted by ‘Hard Knocks Cage Fights’ and was held in St. Clairsville, OH.  The  event arena was sold out as over 2,500 MMA fans enjoyed 15 cage fights.

For more information go to:  www.hardknockscagefights.com

Amateur Muay Thai Fight: Allison Glenny(State College, PA)

YouTube Preview ImageAllison Glenny trains Muay Thai under coach, Bruce Lombard, out of Titan Fitness and MMA in State College, PA.  On April 18, 2009 she had her first amateur Muay Thai fight in Hamburg, PA.  Glenny won a unanimous three round decision in a fast paced battle over a determined opponent from Allentown, PA.

As displayed in the video above, Allison showed amazing poise in her first Muay Thai fight displaying accurate punch to kick combinations and powerful knees in the clinchzorb canada.  Knocking her opponent down twice with her straight rear cross, plus her relentless high to low attack and dominance with the plumm position, the judges rewarded her the decision with scores of: 30-25, 30-25, 30-26.

Allison Glenny will return to the ring this July.

Amateur Muay Thai Fight: Kristen Althouse(State College, PA)

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Kristen Althouse is a Amateur Muay Thai Fighter training under coach, Bruce Lombard, out of Titan Fitness & MMA in State College, PA.  Kristen had her second amateur fight on April 18, 2009 in Hamburg, PA.  Althouse was involved in a highly competitive fight against a very strong opponent, Ally McGinley, that resulted in a draw through the judges eyes: 29-28, 28-29, 30-30.

The video above shows the competitiveness of the back and forth fight.  Kristen showed great heart and will as she withstood the aggressive first round attack of  McGinley.  But, she was able to recover and push the pace the rest of the fight.  Althouse seem to win the end of each round which could have given her the decision in most judges opinion.  She displayed good high to low offensive attacks and attempted to neutralize her opponents effective punching attack with countering front kicks(teep) and a few jumping knees. 

Althouse was able to effectively counter  McGinley’s clinch by using her over/under arm position and returning knees at her opponent.  When Kristen applied her plumm she was very dominant and landed knees at will as Ally could not defend or counter the position. 

This was a fast paced fight against to well conditioned athletes!  Viewers, please feel free to be a judge and give your own opinion on who won the fight!

Instructional Video Review: CSW 2008 Camp

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Overview -This DVD set features former 2-time light heavyweight Shooto World Champion and now world renown MMA coach, Erik Paulson.  Also featured is Greg Nelson, veteran MMA coach and trainer for UFC Heavyweight World Champion, Brock Lesner, and former UFC Lightweight World Champion, Sean Sherk.  Erik Paulson and Greg Nelson share and demonstrate tons of  standing to ground the material. Valuable training tips, techniques, and drills are presented throughout this series.   

Review -  This video is over four hours of MMA techniques and drills.  Erik Paulson and Greg Nelson are two of the most recognized MMA coaches in the world and train some of the best fighters in the world for a reason. This video covers everything a student and fighter of any level would want in an MMA instructional video.  Paulson and Nelson demonstrate multiple techniques and tips in all areas including: boxing, kickboxing, submissions, ground and pound, clinching, strength training, wrestling, and much much more. 

Rating – (5 out of 5)  In my opinion, CSW 2008 Camp DVD is one of the best Mixed Martial Arts instructional videos available today.  This is one of those videos that you will have to watch numerous times just to gather all the information.  It is worth every penny! Have a notebook ready!!

How to Order - Visit www.erikpaulson.com for purchasing information

Review By: Bruce Lombard, Certified Combat Submission Wrestling Coach. Titan Fitness, State College, PA

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